Our Mission

The Center for WorkLife Law is a research and advocacy organization at UC Hastings College of the Law that seeks to advance gender and racial equality in the workplace and in higher education. WorkLife Law focuses on initiatives with the potential to produce concrete social, legal, and institutional change within a three to five year timeframe. Our current major initiatives include programs for advancing women leaders, eliminating barriers for pregnant and breastfeeding workers and students, preventing Family Responsibilities Discrimination, and helping companies to interrupt and correct bias in the workplace and create more stable schedules for their hourly workers.

More about the Center for WorkLife Law

WorkLife Law News

Deputy Director Liz Morris writes blog post describing threat of Workflex Act

Closeup of caring mother holding head on sick daughter forehead

Liz Morris outlines three key problems with a new bill introduced in Congress, the Workflex in the 21st Century Act, in her latest HuffPost blog post. The Act threatens working parents’ ability to care for and support their families by undermining existing state laws and leaving employees vulnerable to employer abuse. Check out the full post here.

More

White Paper: Does the stereotype that “Asian people are good at science” help women of Asian descent in STEM careers? No.

woman scientist with microscope

New research from the Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings on bias against Asian women in STEM.  “The stereotype in the United States is that “Asian people are good at science.” You might think that this stereotype would advantage U.S. women of Asian descent in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. We found the opposite: instead, they encounter the same types of bias that other people of color do. This information is important because most diversity initiatives in STEM address the challenges faced by under-represented minorities (URMs)—black and Latino/a people—but exclude Asian people.”

More

Supporting Breastfeeding Moms at Work: How a Doctor’s Note Can Make the Difference

Nursing Area sign

One of the most critical junctures for community support of breastfeeding is the mother’s return to work. When breastfeeding workers have access to both time and space for expressing breast milk, they are more likely to breastfeed for the recommended term, yet many mothers still struggle to access these simple accommodations in their workplace. Healthcare providers can and should aid nursing mothers in accessing these accommodations.

More

All news

Featured Publications